The Art of Seeing.

The Art of Seeing.

Could it be comparable to the art of stopping?

Perhaps the art of finishing?

 

Recently, I have been devouring podcasts on art and on business.

I enjoy both as they feed both sides of my brain. A person cannot have one without the other, no?

The artist must create. Create. Their. Very. Best. Work.

The artist must also know how to sell their work.

Sell directly to patrons, OR to a gallery.

As it turns out, I am both artist and gallerist. Responsible for the sales of my artists, for myself and my husband.

 

But, back to the art of seeing.

 

I have been listening to this podcast with Quang Ho:

 https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/art-chats-linda-fisler-presented/id534191682?mt=2&i=362610601

Quang Ho is one of the artists I am most fascinated by. He talks on the art of seeing and what that means. I've listened to this podcast 3, maybe 4 times, in the hopes of gleaning insight to help my work evolve.

The latest and perhaps most important information I have replayed countless times is the bit about light and shadow, and Rembrandt. How the science of light and shadow in 7 steps is so profoundly simple an 8 year old could understand. As I listened  over and over to these steps - I painted. I painted a wonderful start on a self portrait I am working on to meet a deadline.  As I painted, my focus was on letting the value of colour turn the form, creating a more 3 dimensional shape.

I felt so happy with Sunday's  outcome, Monday I completely dove in to painting while listening to Phil Collins Easy Lover and Groovy Kind of Love...as if his musical mastery coupled with nostalgia would help me complete this new work. Without too much time passing, I ruined it. I erased, repainted, erased, repainted, and erased and repainted one more time before I picked up a new canvas to lay down a wash of color to tone the back ground. You see, I was painting without any intention...other than from the feeling of spontaneity as the notes of the music echoed through the studio.

 

I decided that I was having too much fun listening to music, and immediately went back to "studying" via podcast. 

 

The ability to study a subject, and paint what I see without force, is undeniably the most difficult thing I have tried to achieve. The portrait and the figure (in my opinion) are the most difficult subject to pursue, as the human eye can detect a flaw in one quick second...even if they are not able to pinpoint the flaw, the human eye knows something is off.

 

While I am certain I will always be on the quest of "seeing", it is plain as day I was well on my way to making the self portrait muddy and over worked. 

 

Monday's  lesson: know when to start so I can know when to stop. 

                AKA: painting with intention.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

After a long conversation Sunday night with veteran artist, Neil Jussila, from Billings, MT, I have finally decided to blog. While his work is completely opposite of mine, I greatly admire his work. He recommended the benefits of journaling...he told me himself he is half way through his 73rd year. Who am I to question such sound advice. After all, this is a practice that has proven to stand the test of time. Without journaling we may not have ever known Anne Frank.

 

Thank you for reading. Thank you for following my work.

 

Cheers from ⭕️⬆️, MT.

Coila Evans

Artist. Proprietress.

www.coilaevans.com

www.coilaevansartandgiftgallery.com

 

Posted on April 19, 2016 and filed under Blog.